Filter Out the Noise! Twitter Lists for Writers

Writers and social media icons

2 Reasons Twitter Lists Are AWESOME for Writers

 

1. Lists are a networking shortcut.

Twitter has almost half a billion users. Lists help you find the people you actually want to connect with: writers, editors, agents, publishers and readers.

Launching a new romance novel? Check out which users have Bella Andre on a “Must Read” list.

Rather than running non-stop searches, use your time wisely. A good list can net you thousands of new contacts in one click.

2. Lists help filter out the content you want to see.

Newcomers to Twitter often complain that their newsfeed is just a lot of noise. Lists are a great way to filter out that noise.

Subscribing to industry- or genre-specific lists (or creating your own) allow you to tailor the tweets you see. Maybe you’re only interested in seeing tweets about craft. Maybe you’re trying to do agent research and want to keep an ear out for calls or tips from your dream agents (don’t forget: lists can be public or private). Whatever your goal, lists put all the information in one spot.

How to Find Other Writers’ Lists

Every writer wants to streamline social media time. So why reinvent the wheel? Hundreds of publicly shared Twitter lists already exist. And tracking them down is a simple matter.

Just check out a writer or three you respect and is an active Twitter user. Odds are good they’ve already started building a terrific list or are a member of great lists themselves.

To access another Tweeter’s lists, click on “More,” then “Lists.”

Twitter Lists for Writers

Once you find a list you like, you have 2 options:

1. Subscribe to that list. This means you’ll see all updates from list members in your newsfeed. However, it does not mean you auto-follow every Tweeter on that list. This is a great option for writers who are looking to gather resources, optimize their time, and explore potential connections, but aren’t making networking a priority.

2. Follow every member on the list. This option is more time-consuming, but means you’re actually connecting with other writers, readers and professionals. This is the better option for writers who are looking to build a following and grow their network. Bonus points? Add each new connection to a list of your own!

Ready to Create Your Own Lists?

Found a great contact and don’t want to lose them? Click on the gear beside any Twitter user and select “Add/Remove from List.”

Add to a Twitter List

Once there, simply add them to one or more lists. 

List Suggestions

Not sure what kind of list you should make? Here are some ideas of useful Twitter lists for writers:

  • Writers
  • Agents
  • Editors
  • Publishers
  • Conferences
  • Readers of “X” Genre
  • Future Readers
  • Book Bloggers
  • VIPs (fill this list with contacts you don’t want to miss an update from)

Want to access my Twitter lists? Click here to find them. (I especially recommend my “Writers” list…almost 3000 members!)

Writerly Links of the Week

Epic Pin of the Week! Courtesy of Stephanie Pui-Mun Law

Epic Pin of the Week!
Courtesy of Stephanie Pui-Mun Law

Classic Fantasy Quote of the Week:

Words are pale shadows of forgotten names.”      

~ The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss

Writerly Wisdom of the Week:

The doors to the world of the wild Self are few but precious. If you have a deep scar, that is a door, if you have an old, old story, that is a door. If you love the sky and the water so much you almost cannot bear it, that is a door. If you yearn for a deeper life, a full life, a sane life, that is a door.     ~ Clarissa Pinkola Estés

Links on Writing:

Prefer your writer links fresh from the source? Follow me on Twitter or Pinterest (that’s where I share my most favourite links)!

The Return of Writerly Links, Proudly Prevented by World Cup and Other Friendly Diversions

World Cup

So it’s been a month-long hiatus.

Classes full of summer-happy students were taught, babies were born (not mine), and most ominously (for my writing productivity, at least) World Cup 2014 began. I…can’t look away. As we speak. Brazil & Cameroon play the final group game and…David Luiz to Fred…he scores!!!

It is a sickness.

In my (desperate) defense, there’s an awful lot of colourful characters and dramatic narratives playing out. Could be considered…research…?

In more writerly news, I did do some useful stuff this month. My short story “Black as Sin” received honourable mention in the WCDR Short Story Contest (yay!). I’ve bought my airfare and registration for 2014 World Fantasy Convention in November. The 2012 Toronto version was so awesome, and I know SO much more useful writer-y stuff now. All that remains is to excise “stuff” and undictionary-certified “-y” words from my vocabulary so I can masquerade as an adult, and all will be well!

OH! And I totally signed up to do a slam performance. Anyone (local…or hey, with an over-large travel budget) that wishes to watch me be talk-y on stage, do come out on July 7th to the Bear and Firkin at 1294 Kingston Road, Pickering. You *might* catch the encore at the WCDR July Breakfast, but only if I manage to sound entertaining the first time round.

And now, back to our wishful-thinking-y regularly scheduled program:

Classic Fantasy Quote of the Week:

“If reassurances could dull pain, nobody would ever go to the trouble of pressing grapes.”      ~ The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch

Writerly Wisdom of the Week:

“I think it’s fairly common for writers to be afflicted with two simultaneous yet contradictory delusions: the burning certainty that we’re unique geniuses, and the constant fear that we’re witless frauds who are speeding toward epic failure.”     ~ Scott Lynch

Links on Writing:

Prefer your writer links fresh from the source? Follow me on Twitter or Pinterest (that’s where I share my most favourite links!